How hey.com is crushing objections to acquire new users

hey.com800x450Image: hey.com

Jason Fried is no stranger to Internet businesses (or to other entrepreneurs for that matter), so when he decided to launch a new email service hey.com mid-2020, people took notice.

It took 18 months to acquire the domain name, and with a short name like that + fresh take on email features, the $99 per year plan is well worth it for many.

Here's a one-liner from a passionate fan:

Wow wow wow wow I'm in love 😍

One of the biggest fears people have with signing up for a new email service provider is that you don't own the domain name. And that's kind of important these days so you're not locked into the service.

Funny enough, the company tackles that head-on with the forever yours promise.

If you choose to leave hey.com after you've paid for just one year, you get to keep your email address.

They make this work by forwarding your email to whatever your new provider is.

As a visitor, this is one less consideration I have to deal with and I don't know of many services that have even thought of offering the same.

Is this remarkable marketing or what? Seth Godin would be proud of this purple cow 🐮

Now if they manage to turn their Twitter handle from @heyhey to just one @hey, our socks will truly be blown off 🧦💥


Action Steps:

  • What's the main objection your visitors might stumble upon when evaluating your service? Don't hide it, instead — dissolve it by offering a solution.

  • Each action on your page could have small objections. Squash them too (eg: sign upfree 1-month trial, no cc required)

Hustling tips for devs 👩‍💻👨‍💻💵
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